Sunday, September 10, 2017

Wideman Pools
2567 Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
636-931-7665


How to Winterize your Cartridge Filter
At the end of the season, pool owners have a golden opportunity to use the down time to deep clean cartridge filters ahead of next season   
1. Hose off the filter
Using a standard garden hose, rinse off the filter from top to bottom. (Pre-treat with a little D.E. in our cartridge filters, which makes the dirt come off a lot easier.)
Never pressure-wash the filter, as the bands holding the pleats in place can snap under pressure. Should this happen, the pleats will collapse on themselves, reducing the surface area of filtration.
2. Soak the filter
After hosing down the cartridges it is important to put the filters through a soaking process. This can be done using 55-gallon plastic drums to allow the filters to soak overnight in muriatic acid and a filter-cleaning agent, which is available from most pool stores.
3. Repeat soak
Once the filters have soaked overnight, lightly rinse the filters and place them in a fresh water drum to soak again. Once finished, an optional liquid chlorine bath can be performed to brighten and lighten the filters.
By doing this final soaking so they look nicer and last longer. In some cases, these soaking procedures may need to be repeated depending on how dirty the filter cartridge is.
4. Air dry
Once the cartridge is clean, it is best to let the filter cartridges air-dry before using them again. Allowing them to dry completely gives the cartridge time for the fibers to fluff back up, which is important because the fibers need to expand to be effective. If not, they can be pushed down easily, which reduces the filter cycle.
It is recommended the pool owner have two sets of cartridges. This allows the pool owner to continue using their pool while the other set is being cleaned.

It’s best to do this when you close the pool for the season.  The process is important to also inspect to ensure that the filter media isn't ripped or torn.  
Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team

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Sunday, August 27, 2017




Wideman Pools, LLC
2567 US Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
www.widemanpools.com
636-931-POOL (7665)





How to Detect A Failing Pump and Prevent It.


Pool pumps use a lot of power and create a lot of heat for normal operation.
The four reasons pumps fail are: Friction, Lack of Airflow, Suction-Side Restrictions and Pressure-Side Restrictions.
They are also in direct heat during the hottest time of the year, thus a higher potential to over heat
Pumps can overheat in two ways, electrical problem or friction.  However, the lack of water or drawing to much current is the greatest potential for fire.
A simple test to see if you pump is running hot is to put your hand carefully on top of the motor.  If it is so hot you cannot rest your hand on it most likely is a failing pump.
Another symptom of a failing pump is if the pump won’t turn off.    That may last for a few days and could go on for up to a year.

The best way to prevent this is with proper care and maintenance!
Hope this is helpful.

Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team

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Sunday, August 13, 2017


 Image result for cost of an in ground pool

Wideman Pools, LLC
2565 Hwy 67 So.
Festus, MO 63028
636-931-7665


What is the cost of an in-ground pool?
The cost of  an in-ground pool will vary based the size and type of pool,  the location where the pool will be installed and any additional features, addon's etc.
Some people say that the ‘type of pool” is the most important factor to consider when looking at the cost of an in-ground pool.  The type of pool (concrete, vinyl or fiberglass) is important for other factors such as what you like, your location, etc. But if you want to figure out how much does it cost to put in a pool, this is not necessarily the case.  Vinyl, fiberglass or concrete pools can be around the same price for similar pools.  You should choose pool type based on what you like and what is available as much as by price point.
Pool installation price can really impact the  cost of an in-ground pool.  You will need to have a site survey to determine how hard is it to dig in your backyard and the accessibility of your backyard.  Some of the items that can really impact price are 91) if the location is level (2) how rocky the dig will be (3) how accessible the area is for equipment and workers.  (4) How much labor costs in your area.
The other big factor in the cost of in ground pool is the style of pool, as you might imagine the larger the pool, the more features the more expensive.
When considering the cost of your in-ground pool the first thing that you want to think about is the pool size and shape.  Generally speaking the bigger the pool and the more exotic the shape the more expensive the pool. Simple, small shapes are generally the least expensive.  Also having a deep end will really not impact the price as much.
The other big factor is features.  Features can include add on spas. hot tubs, slides etc, as well as finishes like pebble tec, pool tiles etc.  Features can also include high end equipment like automatic pool covers, automatic pool cleaners and salt water filtration systems.


When you are getting an estimate for the cost of an in-ground pool make sure that you get at least 3 estimates and also ask for prices based on different combinations of size, shape and features.

Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team

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Sunday, July 30, 2017

Step Into Swim

Who We Are
The Step Into Swim™ Campaign is a 10-year initiative to create 1 million more swimmers. Organized by non-profit, 501(C)(3) National Swimming Pool Foundation®, the campaign raises funds that are directly given to leading learn-to-swim organizations. The Foundation has matched dollar for dollar every donation given in 2012. Supporters of the campaign believe that investing in the next generation of swimmers – for fun, for fitness, for family safety – and teaching people of all ages and ethnicities, is a necessary investment and will improve the health and future of our nation.

Hold the control button and Click the link below for more information and a video explaining who “The Step Into Swim” is:

Wideman Pools
2565 Hwy 67 So.
Festus, MO  63028

636-931-POOL

Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team

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Sunday, July 16, 2017



Wideman Pools, LLC

2567 Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
Widemanpools.com
636-931-7665


Image result for hayward salt generators




Choosing between salt or chlorine is a major pool decision and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. While the decision is ultimately based on your personal needs and preferences, we want to help you get to know the options better, so you can make the best decision for you.

Salt

Saltwater pools use dissolved salt to sanitize your pool and keep it fresh and clean. While you are using salt, instead of chlorine, the end result is the same as using chlorine directly, as both methods are producing hypochlorous acid which is what sanitizes your pool.

Advantages
  • You do not have to store and handle chlorine which can be dangerous
  • Less maintenance - You don’t have to interact with salt systems as often as chlorine systems
  • The water feels softer to some
  • Less trips to your local pool store
  • Lower ongoing costs
  • Safer on skin and hair
  • Lower levels of chlorine
  • Don’t fade clothing as much as chlorine
  • Salt does not evaporate from a pool the way chlorine does
Disadvantages
  • Higher up-front costs
  • Salt is corrosive and can damage metal ladders, screws on lights and trim and equipment (i.e. heat exchanger)*
  • Can damage salt-averse decking*
  • Chlorine is still present
  • Salt systems are more complicated
Chlorine

Chlorine pools use chlorine to keep your pool clean and are one of the most conventional types of pools.

Advantages
  • Clears up your water faster, in most cases
  • Easy to operate
  • Chlorine tablets are readily available at most pool stores
  • Lower up-front costs
  • Safer on pool accessories and salt-averse decking
  • Chlorine kills mildew, mold buildup and bacteria living in the water
 Disadvantages

  • Fades clothing
  • Can be harmful for your skin and eyes
  • Needs to be tested and replenished more regularly
  • Chemicals are dangerous if not stored and handled properly
  • Chlorine evaporates
  • Higher ongoing costs
Thank,
The Wideman Pool Team




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Sunday, July 2, 2017

Image result for dry stack stone wall

Wideman Pools, LLC
2567 Hwy 67 
Fesuts, MO  63028
widemanpools.com
636-931-7665



Dry-stack stone can be applied to just about any vertical surface. Most designers prefer to use it as an accent on a raised seat wall, fireplace, bar or waterfeature. I think it looks great throughout the yard.
You can offer several looks to your clients. One effect involves stacking stones that are 2 inches or less in thickness, but I personally prefer to mix it up more, using some stones that are as thick as 5 to 6 inches. You can also choose different varieties of stone to combine with the main species.
Dry-stack is very slow work, which makes it costly. Each setter tries to finish about 1 square foot an hour — less if they’re using mostly thin stone. Because of the considerable expense, most people limit its use.
A successful dry-stack craftsperson achieves three main goals:
Walk a line between natural and orderly.
You don’t want the project to look as uniform as brick, but it shouldn’t look random or thrown together either. The work has to fit in the confines of the wall. To maintain order, each piece of rock is made level and plumb.
Mix the rocks up.
A good blend of colors and textures should be the end result.
Keep the joints fairly short and tight.
Neither horizontal nor vertical joints should be too long because that can ruin the rustic look. Remember to keep the joints tight because you’re aiming for the illusion that there is no mortar holding the wall together. This increases shadowing along the surface.
Keeping these three principles in mind, use the following eight steps for setting dry-stack stone.
1) Select your rock at the stone yard.
Dry-stack works best with flagstone or other sedimentary rocks that break off in strata. This gives you a layered look. For waterfeatures, use harder varieties that can withstand chemically treated water. Just don’t forget that the harder the stone, the more time it will take to fabricate on site.
Choosing the best rocks is partly a science and partly an art. You want to make sure your selections have enough character and mix well with the rest of the stack.
Start by examining the edges. Because they have the most interesting color, texture and patterning, you’ll want to display this part of the stone on the face of the wall. Watch for pieces with different looks, so you can mix it up on the job.
Study the stone’s texture. Keep your eye out for interesting irregularities, which provide uniqueness and shadowing. Don’t go overboard, though. The stones will have to sit within the plumb line, so drastic bumps will require extra time for fabrication.
You’ll also want to observe the stone’s thickness, being sure to get enough variation. For example, you might think that Arizona flagstone would be ideal because it’s so consistent. In actuality, that type of stone has a bricklike uniformity you don’t want. Most of the stone should range from 1 to 3 inches thick, but we also combine small slivers with chunks that can get as large as 6 inches.
If you want to add more variety, mix in a different kind of stone to accent the wall in spots. Usually, I’ll stick with the same basic family, but choose a darker color or noticeably thicker pieces.
Finally, examine the whole rock to make sure the top and bottom surfaces aren’t wavy. The specimens can be bowed because they’ll be cut in strips 2 to 5 inches wide, so mild curves won’t show. But drastic waving will impact the strips. You want the thickness to be relatively consistent across the stone rather than tapered from one side to the other. That way, they’re easier to level as you set them.
Some quarries will palletize rock that is best for the dry-stack technique.
2) Establish your guidelines.
Dry-stack stone has a lot of character, but there should be a definite sense of order, too. This is accomplished by
establishing distinct boundaries. Set a story pole, a 2-by-4 at the top of the wall where you can pull plumb lines (2). Boards should go at the sides.
Decide how far you want the stones to protrude from the block wall or other structure. You’ll be working with pieces of varying depths, so it’s important to plan where to line up the front of each rock. Five inches is a good, workable setback because it gives you more latitude for dealing with wider stones.
If space is too tight, 5 inches may not be possible. In such instances, the project will take longer to finish. That’s because you may need to saw each piece individually to make it shallower. Many varieties of stone shatter if you try to snap them off into strips less than 4- to 5 inches.
3) Cut the rock into strips.
If you do this stage right, you’ll have plenty of color and texture to showcase on the wall. If not, you can waste the most interesting part of the rock.
When cutting a piece of flagstone (3), make maximum use of the edges. This is what you want to showcase on the front of the wall. To do this, cut around the perimeter of the stone so the edge surface is on the front of all of your strips. Then cut the interior pieces into strips. Those will be more consistent in color and texture, and make good filler. Remember, don’t merely cut the flagstone plank from one end to the other. If you do, the color and texture variation on two sides of the rock will be hidden.
Get a feel for how thinly the rock can be split. When working with harder varieties, you’ll need to produce wider strips — say, 4- to 5 inches. If you try to cut a rigid material too narrow, it will shatter.
4) Put down the mortar.
Mortar goes on the foundation before you place the first course of rock.
Start with a good mortar. Don’t use a sand that’s too coarse.
Instead, stick with a finer type, such as dry plaster sand. This provides better hold in the tight joints.
Put enough mortar to hold the stone down and also to backfill the void between the stone and structure (4). The mortar will be thinner in front, and considerably thicker in the back.
Sometimes you need almost wafer-thin or pie-shaped pieces to fit into a given space. Consider using thinset for these pieces because they’ll hold better.
5) Choose a piece that will fit — or make it fit.
While it doesn’t look like it, you are actually setting the stone in courses. Base your work around the larger stones: If you have a 6-inch-thick piece, for example, stack thinner ones on either side until they meet up with the larger specimen.
From the beginning, choose strips of differing lengths and thicknesses so it doesn’t look too refined (5A). With each fresh stone, select a new size, color and pattern. Don’t concentrate similar tones in the same area. Set thin rocks next to thick ones and long stones over short ones. That way, you won’t have continuous joints running vertically or horizontally. Avoid using too many stones longer than 1 foot.
In a perfect world, the ideal piece would fit precisely. However, this is not always the case. You might need to saw a strip so that it’s a little narrower from side to side or shallower from front to back. It helps to chip pieces a little in the front to add texture (5B).
Curves and rounded corners are a minor complication. You can use some smaller, wedge-shaped pieces to make rocks fit around bended areas (5C), but be sure to use some longer pieces as well, so the spot matches the rest of the work.
If you’re having trouble finding enough rock that naturally curves around the front, create a rounded area by chipping two corners off to break the straight line. This is well worth the time it takes because it makes the curve look like the rest of the job.
6) Finish setting the rock.
Tap the stone so it’s set firmly in the layer of mortar, leaving a joint only about 1/8-inch thick.
Use a level with each stone to make sure it’s even and plumb (6A).
Remove any evidence of mortar. First wipe any excess oozing, then, after a few stones are set, gently rinse the face (6B) to pull out any mortar in the front and recess the joint. Now you have shadowing where you would normally see a grout joint.
7) Wrap it up.
When doing this work, you always have to think a step ahead. This becomes even more important when nearing the top or ends of the wall. At this point, start anticipating how the final rocks will fit. They all have to end at the same spot, but you can’t break from the random-looking pattern as you get close to finishing. Start figuring out where a big piece and several smaller ones will work best. Otherwise, you may back yourself into a corner.
8) Seal it.
When the job is finished, use a penetrating sealer to make the stone more durable. This especially helps with softer stone. Apply at least two coats. More should be used if the rock will be exposed to chemically treated water.
THE BIG PICTURE
A dry-stack project won’t come together without considerable planning. Ask clients if they want thinner or thicker rock, or a combination. Decide if a particular tone should dominate and what color proportions are best — maybe 30-percent pinkish rock with yellower stone taking up the rest.
After selecting color combinations, explain it to your setters. Have one setter do a small sample to make sure everyone’s on the same page. Make the needed adjustments, then show it to the rest of the crew. During construction, have the setters step back and examine their work from a distance to make sure they’re maintaining the same look.
As mentioned in the story, sometimes I use a few pieces that are noticeably different from the rest. They might be significantly larger or from another variety of stone. It’s a good idea to randomly mark on the wall approximately where these specimens should go so they’re scattered how you want.
Each setter will have his or her own style. If you’re using multiple people on a job, don’t let them work in the same spot for too long. Instead, have them move after finishing a couple of square feet. That way, you won’t see an obvious difference from one part of the wall to another.


 Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team



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