Sunday, May 21, 2017

Wideman Pools, LLC
2567 Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
Widemanpools.com
636-931-7665
 Image result for stains in pools




How to Remove Stains from Your Pool
Copper Stains (Blue Green)
Copper stains are probably some of the most common stains we see in our pools. The introduction of copper to the pool water can come from algaecides, heat exchangers, older copper plumbing, etc. The good news is that we can prevent most cases of blue/green staining by following dosing charts on algaecides and maintaining proper pH levels in our pools, but we all know that doesn't always happen.
There are liquids and dry granular stain treatments that work well on removing these types of stains on all types of pool surfaces. The most commonly used granular removers include citric acid and ascorbic acid. The granules do a good job of lifting the satin, but require the addition of a sequestering agent to help the filtration system trap the removed metals from the pool water. Be aware that the liquid stain removers also contain phosphoric and/or phosphonic acid, which adds phosphates to your pool water that will need to be removed at a later time. There are phosphate-free liquid sequesterants, but they are used to help remove metals that are already in the water. The non-phosphate sequesterants will only be effective on fresh stains that have not yet set into the surface.
  
Purple Haze
Copper cyanurate staining is caused when you have a cyanuric acid level over 100 ppm that combines with copper in the pool water to form a purple precipitant on the surface of the pool, tile line, skimmers and pool cleaner. The problem will continue to persist until you reduce the cyanuric acid level down to about 50 ppm. Once you lower the CYA, the staining usually goes away as well, but you may need to brush the affected areas to help some stubborn spots. When you drain water to lower the CYA, it addresses the copper in the water as well, but you should test the water for any remaining copper residual.
Iron Stains
Iron stains are going to appear brownish in color; if you have dissolved iron in the pool, it can cause a brownish tint to the water. Iron can make its way into your pool in a number of different ways. Some pool heater headers are made of iron, and over time the protective coating gets worn down inside, exposing the iron base metal to the pool's chemistry. An erosion tablet feeder plumbed in without the proper check valve in place will erode the header as well. Lawn care professionals can also introduce iron to your pool through fertilizers, but the most common means of introducing iron to the pool is through well water. In many areas of the country, people draw their pool water from wells that contain metals.
The procedure for removal of iron stains is the same as above for copper. Be sure to balance the water and figure out the source of the iron in order to minimize the chances of further stains. If the iron is from well water, it's best to get on a maintenance program of adding a sequestering agent on a weekly basis.
Organic Stains
As leaves and other organic materials make their way into the pools and settle to the bottom, the tannins in the leaves can leach out into the water and leave stains where the leaves rested. This is pretty common when leaves sit on winter covers or at the bottom of the pool in the off-season. Sometimes these stains will go away as we balance and shock the pool to get the chlorine levels up. If the stains are still lingering after the water is balanced, the stains can usually be lifted rather easily with citric or ascorbic acid.
Galvanic Corrosion
Galvanic corrosion is an electrochemical process in which one metal corrodes preferentially to another when both metals are in electrical contact in the presence of an electrolyte. (In other words, the less noble metal undergoes corrosive attack.)
This happens in our pools with salt generators every minute the cell is making chlorine. Through galvanic corrosion, the corroded metals dissolve and can reach a saturation point in the water and begin to stain the surface of your pool. It doesn't corrode the salt cell because it is made of a more noble metal than your pool ladders, light rings, etc. You can help slow down galvanic corrosion by adding a sacrificial anode made of zinc. Zinc is a less noble metal than other metals associated with your pool, so the galvanic corrosion attacks it first, and thus the zinc sacrifices itself in order to save the other metals from degradation. It's a good idea to use a non-phosphate sequesterant as a maintenance tool in salt pools for this reason.
Preventing The Stains
When staining appears in a pool, it's important to first test the pool water and be sure that the water chemistry is balanced. If there are metals in the water, add a sequestering agent to help keep them from precipitating out of the water and creating more staining as you correct the water chemistry. A lot of staining in pools is caused by the pH dropping down and aggressively dissolving the metals into solution. Once the water balanced, then the real stain battle begins.
There will be occasions when you have tried every trick in the book to help remove the stain from the pool, but it just will not lift off the surface. In these cases it may be that the pool needs to be drained and acid washed to remove the staining. This is generally going to happen on plaster pools. Vinyl and fiberglass pools usually respond pretty well to the treatments since they aren't as porous as plaster pools, so the stains lift off easier.
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in the case of stain prevention. Pool professionals and their customers generally neglect brushing the pool walls and they also tend to avoid the steps needed to prevent staining. The simple addition of a sequestering agent added as a maintenance measure on a weekly/biweekly/monthly basis, whichever fits your needs, goes a long way to keeping our pool surfaces looking newer longer.

Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team



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Sunday, May 7, 2017


Wideman Pools, LLC

2567 Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
Widemanpools.com
636-931-7665


Image result for stains in pools







How to Get Rid of Stains in Salt Generator Pools



Salt chlorine pools have become quite popular for their convenience. There are no hazardous chemicals on site, water is sanitized and oxidized automatically. There are little to no chloramines. Many users of salt generators claim softer feeling water with less chemical odor and no dry or irritated skin.
Along with the report of these benefits, some have also reported some strange phenomena as well. These include things like discolored water, strange stains throughout the pool that are hard to remove and prevent. Stains appearing in salt pools include:
• Black flecks on pool bottom
• Black staining on ladders and light rings
• Reoccurring stains and discoloration on light rings around steps or rails and discolored water. 
• Purple haze and debris in pool water 
These stains seem to be a mystery, however in salt pools with high TDS they are due to a simple chemical reaction known as Galvanic Corrosion. To understand this electro chemical reaction a simple understanding of the technology of chlorine generators is first needed. 
Chlorine generators work using a process known as electrolysis. In nature chlorine is found primarily in the chloride ion, which is a component of salt found in the earth or the oceans. Electrolysis is the means of generating chemical products from their native state. A salt generator works by passing electricity through a solution of sodium chloride to produce chlorine as a disinfectant or sanitizer. 
The most popularly used chlorine generators are the in-line type. In these systems salt water is circulated over electrochemical cells. The cells convert the sodium chloride to free available chlorine. The cells used in these systems are typically made of titanium. Though it may seem new the technology of splitting molecules via electrolysis goes back all the way to the 1700s.
History of electrolysis
• 1789 - First use of electricity to separate compounds- electrolysis
• 1800 - First device to generate chlorine using electricity developed by Cruickshank
• 1830 - Faraday used brine (salt water) to produce chlorine gas (this occurs at the anode positive electrode cell) hydrogen gas and sodium hydroxide were also produced (at the cathode negative electrode cell)
How galvanic corrosion occurs in swimming pools:
Galvanic corrosion occurs when dissimilar metals exist in a high TDS solution such as a salt generator pool. Some metals are nobler and more cathodic meaning positive currents flow from these and they tend to steal electrons from the less noble anodic or negative metals. 
A Galvanic Corrosion Chart is used in industries that work with fluids and metals such as cooling towers. The Galvanic Corrosion Chart shows that the "anodic" or "less noble" metals at the negative end of the series such as magnesium, zinc and aluminium - are more likely to corrode than those at the "cathodic" or "noble" end which include gold and graphite. 

There are three things needed in order for galvanic corrosion to occur:
1. Electrochemically dissimilar metals must be present 
2. These metals must be in electrical contact, and 
3. The metals must be exposed to an electrolyte (salt in solution)

In a swimming pool all three of these exist due to the high TDS from the salt content of the water. The electrochemical cells in most chlorine generators are made of titanium which is listed on the Galvanic Corrosion Chart as a nobler metal. Most pools contain some copper in the system as well in the heat exchanger or in any brass fittings or pipe that may be in the system. Copper is a less noble metal than titanium and thus it corrodes as a result of the electrolysis in the high salt solution. This leaves black stains and debris in the pool. Copper is also rendered insoluble in the water. Copper in the water will appear as a green translucent color.
The simple solution to solve this problem is to find another less noble metal to use as a sacrificial anode that corrodes but doesn’t cause staining. When differing metals are added to salt water one metal acts as a cathode this is the nobler of the two. Titanium would be one example of a more cathodic or noble metal. The other metal may be more anodic or less noble. An example of this would be copper. 
Galvanic corrosion occurs because when these two metals are in salt water with an electrical current the weaker less noble metal (copper) will corrode faster than normal. Also the stronger more noble metal (titanium) will corrode much slower than normal. It has been found in various marine industries that the addition of zinc in these types of systems prevents the corrosion of copper and stops the staining. 
Zinc is very low on the galvanic chart and is one of the most anodic metals found. In salt chlorine pools zinc can be added as a solid weight into the skimmer or attached in the circulation system. This slows or stops the corrosion of copper. If the water is discolored from copper it is advised to use a metal removal product along with the zinc to remove the current discoloration and prevent reoccurrence. Most metal products on the market tend to be phosphate based and this too can cause problems in a salt chlorine generator. When selecting a metal product use a phosphate free product. 
What about purple haze?
Another mystery in both salt generator and regular pools is the occurrence of a strange purple coloring and debris. This is due to high levels of cyanuric acid and insoluble copper in the water. If pH and alkalinity go low than copper cyanurate is formed leaving a purple residue along the water line and around lights and steps. The solution here is to lower cyanuric acid down to 35ppm to 50ppm and adjust up the alkalinity and pH. Also, the addition of zinc will help keep copper from corroding into the water.
These simple methods should help clear the mystery and remove the stains.

Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team


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Sunday, April 23, 2017




Wideman Pools, LLc
2567 Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
widemanpools.com
636-931-7665
Why Salt Generators Stop Working
Image result for hayward salt generators work


It has been said that, "There is nothing new under the sun." While salt generators have surged in popularity in the last decade, the technology goes back to 1800. Scientists back then discovered the technology of splitting molecules in a solution using what is called electrolysis. Salts like sodium chloride or sodium bromide are used in a solution that is subject to low voltage electrical current between a pair of cells with opposing charges. One cell, the Anode, contains positive charges and the other, the Cathode, contains negative charges. Electrical ions flow back and forth between the two cells. The result is that molecules are split and chlorine gas is produced at the anode. Hydrogen gas is produced at the cathode. Salt generators produce hydrogen gas, chlorine gas and a solution of sodium hydroxide. When salt generators are working properly they are continuously producing free available chlorine at set levels.

What happens when salt generators fail?
When a unit begins to fail it will not produce sufficient free chlorine to keep up with demand. There are numerous reasons for failure including dirty or calcified cells that need to be cleaned, no power to cells and insufficient levels of salt in the water. There is one main factor to consider first when a salt chlorine generator fails, and that is the presence of phosphates in the pool water.
When levels of phosphate exceed 500 ppb the unit can cease to produce enough free available chlorine to keep up with demand. Most manufacturers of salt chlorine generators will confirm that when there is a problem with production of free available chlorine, a phosphate test is recommended. If the phosphate levels are near or over 500 ppb, a phosphate removal treatment is advised to help the salt chlorine generator function properly.
What does Phosphate have to do with Salt Systems?
So, what is going on when phosphate levels climb in a salt pool? We need to look to the industrial uses of orthophosphate in water treatment. First of all it is important to understand that orthophosphate is the detrimental form of phosphate that exists in water. Orthophosphate will not only interfere with salt generators, it can also cause excessive algae blooms to occur in both traditional and salt pools as well.
A product known as zinc orthophosphate is used in drinking water systems because it adheres to metal pipes and acts as an anti-corrosion agent. So, from this we know that orthophosphate likes to cling to metals. The real interference of phosphates in chlorine generators is still somewhat theoretical. It appears that since orthophosphates attach to metals they attach to the cathode and cause an interference with the flow of electrons between the anode and the cathode of the salt chlorine generator. We do know that higher levels of orthophosphate seem to cause a definite interference with the normal operation of the salt chlorine generators. 
Where are the phosphates coming from?
Phosphates can be introduced into swimming water from a multitude of sources including: fertilizers, organic debris and soil, detergent cleaners, tile cleaners and metal sequestering chemicals. Also, phosphate can come from human perspiration and urea. 
There are several different forms of phosphate depending on the source; all however eventually end up in the form of orthophosphate. Metal products can be one of the main culprits which cause failure in salt chlorine generator pools. This is because staining from metals is more prevalent in salt chlorine pools due to the potential of galvanic corrosion from high TDS of the salt and dissimilar metals present in the water. Most manufacturers of salt chlorine generators will recommend a metal sequestering product be used.  Most metal sequestering products available for pools are phosphonic or phosphoric acid based formulas. When these are added to a salt pool, the result will be a breakdown of the phosphate to free orthophosphate which is what will cause the problems with cells in the chlorine generator. For this reason it is best to use a phosphate free metal sequestering product.
How are the phosphates removed? 
Phosphates can be removed from the pool water by a simple use of a phosphate remover. It is important to understand that orthophosphate in pool water exist in a soluble form. The most effective phosphate removers work by making the soluble orthophosphate precipitate out as a solid. This will cause some cloudiness to the water which can be filtered out readily with the use of a clarifier. However, keep in mind that the more phosphate, the more cloudiness there will be. Also, in extreme cases it can take up to 2 to 3 days for the cloudiness to clear completely. It is important during this cloudy period to have the salt chlorine generator turned off until the water clears. During this period liquid chlorine can be used to keep the residual up. The other option for extreme levels of phosphate — when levels are near or over 5,000 ppb — would be to drain and dilute some or all of the water.  The drain and dilution method may be better used for commercial pools where shut-down time is limited and cloudiness of the water is regulated. In these cases it is advisable to dilute out as much phosphate as possible and then use maintenance doses of phosphate remover to keep levels managed.
How do you keep the Phosphates out? 
It is important in a salt chlorine pool to be diligent about keeping phosphate levels down. The following are some guidelines that can help: 
1) Test water for phosphates on a weekly basis. 
2) Treat with a phosphate remover weekly to keep levels down. 
3) Use only non-phosphate metal products and cleaners. 
4) Clean and remove grass, leaves and any organic debris from pool as quickly as possible.
5) Test tap water to see what levels of phosphate are in the source. 
6) Test for and treat for phosphates after any periods of extreme weather or heavy use. 
7) For commercial pools, avoid using any phosphate-based cleaners on the decking or tile.
8) Operators should discourage patrons from visiting the pool after swimming in nearby lakes.
9) Care should be taken when fertilizing lawns and plants near pool area.
10) Source water should be tested for phosphates as well. Many water municipalities treat with straight orthophosphates at different times. If this is the case then phosphate treatment is recommended at filling and whenever topping off.
Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team



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Sunday, April 9, 2017

Wideman Pools, LLC
2567 Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
636-931-7665





When should the Cartridge be Replaced?
It's easier to replace cartridge media than it is to clean it.  In replacing the media you're getting rid of any biofilm that could inhabit that filter. Also, people moving into new homes with a pool, they like that. They want to replace the filter so they're not swimming in anyone else's biofilm or filtered waste."
The best time to replace a cartridge is when the pressure gauge is high or on a regular basis just to be proactive, but over time any cartridge filter media will develop a hole or tear in the fabric or become hopelessly clogged, forcing replacement.
One of the most common causes of early filter death is clogging due to embedded pool gunk, which tends to be forced deep into the fabric of cartridge filters where it can't be rinsed away.  It gets to the point that there's so much blockage that the filters lose their ability to pass water and trap debris. If the pressure gauge remains high after cleaning a cartridge, it most likely means the fabric has become clogged and the cartridge needs to be replaced.
Thanks,
The Wideman Pool Team


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Sunday, March 26, 2017

Wideman Pools
2567 Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
636-931-7665


When should the Cartridge be Cleaned?
Not too long ago, cartridge filter assemblies were relatively small and needed to be cleaned more frequently. Then in the early 2000s, engineers at the major manufacturers caught on to the idea that a larger filter would mean more filter area, which would mean they wouldn't have to be cleaned as often. This has helped.
Although larger filters reduce frequency of cleaning, the job still must be done and determining when is the first step: keeping a log of filter pressure differential measurements can make this easy and efficient — once you get in the habit. It is best to clean the filter each time you vacuum.
How to Clean the Cartridge
Cleaning a cartridge is a matter of rinsing dirt from a somewhat difficult surface. The deep pleats of a cartridge, while increasing the filter surface area dramatically, are inherently hard to access. You have to get in there and get after it.
Plenty of service techs use a simple pistol grip sprayer on a garden hose — any device that can be turned on and off without going back to the spigot, will save water, which is important in drought-stricken areas. But if you are looking to save time use one of the products on the market specifically designed to force water down into the pleats and make this routine job go faster.
Put the cartridge down on the ground, kneel down on a pad, get the cartridge cleaning tool and start at the top of the cartridge. Hold the cartridge at a 45-degree angle, get down to the band, take out the cartridge cleaning tool and rotate the cartridge and go back in. All the dirt comes out the bottom — you go from a gray filter cartridge to off-white in just a few minutes. It's just plain faster than the garden nozzle, and it saves time.  
 Saving Water
It's not exactly a tip, but any discussion of this topic has to include the fact that the water savings in cleaning cartridge filters is one of their major selling points in areas where water shortages are an issue. Cleaning a cartridge doesn't require the hundreds of gallons of wastewater needed to backwash a sand filter. Depending on the situation, a sand filter may run through 200 to 500 gallons of water in a single backwash cleaning. A cartridge might need five or 10. Saving water is increasingly important.



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Sunday, March 12, 2017

7 Of The Best Waterparks In The United States
 Image result for waterparks
Water parks are a part of the pool industry and even if your family has a pool you may go visit a friend, or relative that doesn’t and wishing there is something you can entertain the kids with.  So here are 7 fantastic water parks in the USA!

Disney’s typhoon Lagoon Waterpark, Orlando, Florida
At Disney’s Typhoon Lagoon you can spend the day sun bathing on the beach, relaxing on the lazy river, crashing into waves in the wave pool or screaming with excitement as you soar down exhilarating water slides. They also offer private surf lessons in their state-of-the-art wave pool!
They also have some fun stores and delicious restaurants when you are ready to relax outside of the water!
Disney’s Blizzard Beach Water Park, Orlando, Florida
Blizzard Beach offers one of the world’s fastest and tallest waterslides – Mount Gushmore – as well as 12 other exciting attractions including water slides, raft rides, a kids play area and a wave pool!
They also offer private patios which are shaded decks that can be used for a quick rest throughout the day! They come with lounge chairs, lockers, and attendants to take orders and help you make the most of your water park experience!
Aquatica Orlando, Orlando Florida
Aquatica is SeaWorld’s waterpark and offers a whole new level experience! The most popular ride, Dolphin Plunge, lets you dive into an underwater world where you race past beautiful dolphins!
Other rides include Ihu’s Breakaway Fall which is the “tallest, steepest and only multi-drop tower in Orlando” and Roa’s Rapids as well as a lazy river and side by side wave pools!
Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari, Santa Claus, Indiana
Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari is a combination theme park and water park with 16 water rides, that offer hours of watery fun!
The park has several waterplay attractions for kids including Kima Bay and Monsoon Lagoon, as well as exciting slides, relaxing rivers, and thrashing wave pools for guests of all ages!
Noah’s Ark Water Park, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin
With over 26 attractions including thrill rides, group rides, kiddy rides, a 4-D Theater and multiple Arcades, there is something for everyone at Noah’s Ark Waterpark!
Noah’s Ark Waterpark is the largest water par in America and also features the world’s largest bowl ride – Time Warp. Other features include the thrilling ¼ mile long Black Anaconda water coaster, raft rides, kiddie areas and a lazy river!
Morey’s Piers and Beachfront Water Parks, Wildwood, New Jersey
Morey’s Pier and Beachfront Water Parks includes five theme parks, two of which are waterparks – Raging Waters and Ocean Oasis!
Raging Waters Water Park offers a lazy river, with float-up snack bars and waterfalls as well as exciting water slides, such as Shotgun Falls which ends with a 6 foot drop and a humongous splash! There are also family friendly obstacles and two kiddie play areas.
Ocean Oasis Water Park + Beach Club features private cabanas, thrilling water slides and play areas on the shore. Cliff Dive sends you down 5 stories in just three seconds while WipeOut lets you race family down a six-lane slide. Their Lazy river also offers swim up refreshments as well as live music!
Water Country USA Williamsburg, Virginia
Situated by Busch Gardens Williamsburg, Water Country USA is Virginia’s largest water park and features water slides and raft rides as well as multiple pools and lazy rivers. They also have private cabanas and a wave pool that are sure to make your day both fun and relaxing.
The parks newest ride, Colossal Curl which has multiple high-adrenaline features, including a funnel and wave element that sends riders high over the park!

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Wideman Pools
2567 US Hwy 67
Festus, MO  63028
636-931-POOL (7665)



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